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Newspaper article

October 2000 Show

"Perceptions
 in Colour"

 

Paintings by:

ED LOENEN

MICHAEL O'TOOLE
(quick link)

NIELS PETERSEN
(quick link)
 

ED LOENEN
 

Ed Loenen, S.F.C.A., was born in the Netherlands in 1938. He came to British Columbia in 1956, received a B.Ed at U.B.C. and later a minor in visual arts. He was privileged to study under Prof. Sam Black and Dr. Robert Steele. For many years Ed taught Art and French at High School level. In 1992, he left full time teaching to pursue 'his first love' and in the fall of that year he was accepted as an active member of the Federation of Canadian Artists. Ed's development as a fine colourist has been exciting, but more importantly, the 1993-95 works exude a new vibrancy and convey a unique, personal style coupled with a mastery of oil painting techniques.



SOLD
"Near Victoria and 18th"
by Ed Loenen
9 x 12 - oil
$470 Framed

 



SOLD
"Anno Domini 2000"
 by Ed Loenen
14 x 18 - acrylic
$850 Framed


SOLD
"Counterpoint Perception"
 by Ed Loenen
12 x 16 - oil
$750 Framed

 


SOLD
"Sorrow and Hope in Strathcona"
 by Ed Loenen
20 x 24 - oil
$1400 Framed

 


SOLD
"Fall Near Princeton"
 by Ed Loenen
9 x 12 - oil
$470 Framed


SOLD
"A Melody in the Monashees"
 by Ed Loenen
8 x 10 - oil
$425 Framed

 


SOLD
"And ... Ah! ... Spring with Bright Wings"
 by Ed Loenen
12 x 16 - acrylic
$750 Framed

 


SOLD
"Rust Gracefully Blanketed" by Ed Loenen
9 x 12 - acrylic
$470 Framed


SOLD
"Tower Street Near Main"
 by Ed Loenen
18 x 24 - oil
$1275 Framed


 


SOLD
"Wonderment in May" by Ed Loenen
8 x 10 - oil
$425 Framed


SOLD
"Warm and Cool Counterpoint"
 by Ed Loenen
8 x 10 - oil
$425 Framed


 
 
 

 
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MICHAEL O'TOOLE
 
Michael O'Toole is a native of British Columbia, born in 1963. He studied architectural design at a technical institute, then worked with firms in that field, and in 1991 he won a prize for "Best Home Design." Later, painting became Michael's all-consuming passion. He paints mainly impressionistic watercolours with landscape, seascape and architecture as his chief subjects. He is adept in other media as well and is currently working in acrylic, with a wide range of subject matters. Nature and architecture are his predominant themes, including scenes from his travels.


SOLD
"In the Shadows of Volterra"
 by Michael O'Toole
36 x 40 - acrylic
$2800 (canvas wrap without frame)


SOLD
"Boats on a Still Shore"
 by Michael O'Toole
20 x 24 - acrylic
$1180 Framed







 


SOLD
"Falls at Nakusp"
 by Michael O'Toole
36 x 36 - acrylic
$2575 Framed

 


SOLD
"Evening, Porto Venere"
 by Michael O'Toole
36 x 48 - acrylic
$3550 Framed


SOLD
"All Gussied Up"
 by Michael O'Toole
30 x 30 - acrylic
$2080 Framed

 


SOLD
"Twilight Birches (the Klimt Influence)"
 by Michael O'Toole
30 x 30 - acrylic
$2080 Framed

 


SOLD
"Shadows of Porto Venere"
 by Michael O'Toole
30 x 30 - acrylic
$2080 Framed

 


SOLD
"Totem at Skedans"
 by Michael O'Toole
11 x 14 - acrylic
$575 Framed

 


SOLD
"Shadows of Prague"
 by Michael O'Toole
24 x 30 - acrylic
$1700 Framed


SOLD
"Autumn Pool (Nakusp)"
 by Michael O'Toole
40 x 48 - acrylic
$3870 Framed

 



SOLD
"The Texada, Run Ashore"
 by Michael O'Toole
12 x 24 3/4 - casein on board
$1040 Framed

 


SOLD
"Ninstints"
 by Michael O'Toole
13 x 16 - acrylic on board
$690 Framed

 


SOLD
"Light and Shadow, Portofino"
 by Michael O'Toole
24 x 30 - acrylic
$1700 Framed

 


SOLD
"Prague"
 by Michael O'Toole
11 x 14 - acrylic
$575 Framed


SOLD
"Tuscan Glow"
 by Michael O'Toole
24 x 30 - acrylic
$1700 Framed

 


SOLD
"The Ticket Collector"
 by Michael O'Toole
24 x 30 - acrylic
$1700 Framed

 


SOLD
"Gateway, Tuscan Farm"
 by Michael O'Toole
11 x 14 - acrylic
$575 Framed


SOLD
"Porto Venere Study"
 by Michael O'Toole
9 x 12 - acrylic
$450 Framed

 
 

 
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NIELS PETERSEN
 

Niels Petersen was born in Vancouver in 1963 and held his first solo gallery exhibition of paintings in 1993.  Mostly self-taught, Niels has also studied painting with senior members of the Federation of Canadian Artists, of which he is an associate member.  The subjects of his bold, bright paintings range from the coast, villages and wilderness around British Columbia, to dramatic urban interiors at home and abroad. 

"Paintings are a reward for slowing down and paying attention to the world.  The search for subject matter encourages a sensitivity to light, shape and colour, which in turn inspires a passion to push these elements further in a painting.  If it succeeds, the painting transcends representation and assumes a spirit of its own."
 


SOLD
"Alley Light, White Rock"
 by Niels Petersen
24 x 30 - oil
$1450 Framed

SOLD
"Night Grocery, East Hastings St., Vancouver"
by Niels Petersen
24 x 30 - oil
$1450 Framed

 


SOLD
"The Creek" by Niels Petersen
8 x 10 - oil
$425 Framed
 


SOLD
"Long Beach, Vancouver Island"
 by Niels Petersen
16 x 20 - oil
$925 Framed

 


SOLD
"On the Hump, Marine Drive, White Rock"
by Niels Petersen
8 x 10 - oil
$425 Framed

 


SOLD
"Frederiksberg, Denmark"
by Niels Petersen
8 x 10 - oil
$425 Framed


SOLD
"Cosmic Alley, White Rock"
by Niels Petersen
36 x 36 - oil
$1850 (canvas wrap
 without frame)
 


SOLD
"Fire Engine, Stanley Park"
 by Niels Petersen
8 x 10 - oil
$425 Framed


SOLD
"Copenhagen Shadows"
by Niels Petersen
16 x 20 - oil
$925 Framed


SOLD
"North Sea, Denmark"
by Niels Petersen
24 x 30 - oil
$1450 Framed

 
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Article from The Peace Arch News (Oct. 14, 2000) courtesy of the publisher

Colour Commentary:
Three-artist show takes bold approach

 by Alex Browne, Arts Reporter

             The three artists gathered at White Rock Gallery for an afternoon chat about their upcoming show share some common ground.

            All changed career directions because of a passion for painting, and all have acquired impressive credentials.

            Niels Petersen was, until the mid-'90s, a reporter for The Peace Arch News -- then made the jump to painting full time.

            Netherlands-born Ed Loenen taught art and French in high school, but left full-time teaching in 1992 to pursue his "first love."

            Michael O'Toole studied architectural design at BCIT and even worked for several architectural firms in Toronto, before surrendering to his "all-consuming passion" for painting.

            All three have exhibited alone and in collective shows -- including the Federation of Canadian Artists Gallery in Vancouver (both Loenen and Petersen have been granted associate status within the Federation). [Gallery note: Michael O'Toole also holds associate status.]

            Petersen has shared shows with both Loenen (Brushspokes I and II) and O'Toole (with Ruth Sawatzky).

            All three are noted for their bold and vivid approach to colour -- Loenen in oils featuring urban scenes; Petersen in paintings featuring both urban and natural landscapes; and O'Toole in sea scenes, architectural studies, many inspired by his travels in the Mediterranean.

            They're all pushing colour to the limit in this show, featuring all new paintings, they promise.

            Add to this the fact Petersen and O'Toole have indulged in friendly sparring since they were six or seven years old, and you have the ingredients for a well, lively discussion, moderated by the courteous, soft-spoken Loenen.

            "Do you mind if we throw colours at your?" O'Toole said (fortunately speaking figuratively) as a prelude to an exchange in which the artists, as artists will, debate the merits of specific paint colours.

            For instance Petersen extols the virtues of cobalt violet light for imbuing a scene with a late afternoon quality (albeit in sparing use, at $27 per tube).

            "The effect," he said, "is subtle but dazzling."

            They're all agreed, he added, that "lemon yellow sucks."

            "I love Thalo green for cool reflective light," O'Toole offers. "It's a mainstay."

            "A mainstay?" Petersen fires. "Get out!"

            Cobalt blue is even more controversial, it seems, with Petersen holding it is a "namby pamby colour" and O'Toole maintaining it's the "meat and potatoes of blue."

            "What do you think about David Langevin's article on colour, about not mixing colours," Loenen ventures.

            "I respect it," O'Toole cautiously offered.

            Before I gained the impression a brawl was about to break out, Petersen (whom I know to be fond of playing Devil's Advocate) assured me "Mike and I have known each other since Grade 2."

            "When we were at school, Niels was the artist and I was focused into architecture," O'Toole said.

            "I drew a lot in elementary school and high school," Loenen said.

            "Did you draw in class?" O'Toole asked. Loenen admitted he did.

            "But I sat close to the teachers, and they always looked past me," he said.

            Of the three, Loenen has possibly the most radical approach to colour.

            "I've been studying it since 1982. I've really been concentrating on the tension between red and green and what happens between them.

            "I have glasses of double black glass and I put them on to check the values--sometimes I'll paint a whole painting with the glasses on, once my palette is finished. It frees me to discover whole new triads of colour."

            "I think the strength of colour comes out in the middle values," O'Toole said.

            "That's the subject matter of what I do. That's the true sense of an artist -- the application of colours in the middle values, not the lights and darks.

            "Would you agree with that Niels?"

            Petersen admitted he hadn't been paying that close attention to what O'Toole was saying.

            "I was thinking about what colour meant to me," he said.

            "Yeah, that's about right," O'Toole offered.

            "I like to exaggerate things," Petersen said.

            "Non-artists may look at presumably grey clouds or a blue sea, but if you really look into what seem to be ordinary colours, these other colours come out."

            Petersen and O'Toole agree the colours of the reference photos they use are totally unsatisfactory--a good thing, freeing them to take an entirely personal approach to the colours of the scene based on their own perceptions.

            "Regular folks may not know about colours," O'Toole said.

            "But they know what they like. They'll see the subtleties, they'll focus in on that. They may not articulate why they like it, but the subtleties will focus their eye to move across the colour and value change."

            A sensitivity to colour becomes irresistible, Loenen said.

            "I was at the dentist's office the other day, looking at their magazine of motorcycles. They have wonderful colours for motorcycles now, fabulous iridescent shades. There was on picture that I sneaked out of the magazine--they had this red light behind a green motorcycle.

            "I took it home. I was totally taken with that. That's how colour can be so exciting to me."

            He counts himself an admirer of the way Cezanne modelled his subjects with progressions from warm to cool colours.

            "Mercie beaucoup, M. Cezanne," he said -- noting, however, although the French master's works are a "feast of colour" his own life was dour and devoid of love.

            But then, this is the continuing anomaly of the artist's daily life and struggle to achieve something on canvas.

            "It's always a struggle," Petersen said.

            "I never know how a painting is going to end up -- it's almost as if it takes on a life of it's own.

            "It's like having a conversation with the painting -- a colour conversation."

 

 
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